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Buildings of Sligo – The Provincial Bank

Sligo’s old buildings – Past and Present

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The Provincial Bank was the first bank opened in Sligo in 1828, originally located across the street near the old bridge on Stephens Street. In 1881, a new Renaissance style building was erected on Stephens Street, designed by the Architect Thomas Manley Deane and built by Joseph Clarence.

The facade is made of Mountcharles sandstone with the side of the building made from Ballisodare limestone. It was built back from the street and originally had ornamental railings. After the bank mergers in the 1970’s, the bank is now operated as Allied Irish Bank (AIB).

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Bank building Sligo 19th century Provincial Bank in Sligo pictured in the 1880’s with ornamental railings

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bsh The building has detailed carvings by DeGroot of Dublin from designs by the architect.

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Sources:

Irish Architectural Archive – < dia.ie >

National Library of Ireland – < nli.ie >

Gallagher, Fiona, The Streets of Sligo – Urban Evolution (Sligo, 2008)

Newspaper Archive – Sligo…

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Cholera Remedy in 1832

In the Summer of 1832, 186 years ago, an outbreak of Cholera was spreading throughout Ireland. Cures and remedy advertisements appeared in newspapers. The text below appeared as an advert for an Apothecary in Sligo. This may have helped some people as dehydration was one of the symptoms. Unfortunately, as many would have taken this… Continue reading Cholera Remedy in 1832

Landed in Van Diemen’s Land

Sligo convict transported to Van Diemen’s Land

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Van Diemen’s Land was set up as a penal colony in 1803 by the British Empire. It is estimated that some 75,000 convicts were shipped there up until 1853 when the mass transportation of people ended. The most common crime that led to transportation was petty theft or larceny. Followed by burglary or housebreaking, highway robbery, stealing clothing, stealing animals, military offences, prostitution and crimes of fraud. Transportation on a large scale ended as the authorities mindful of the rebellion in the American colonies feared a similar uprising could occur on Van Diemen’s Land.

Although mass transportation ended in 1853, political prisoners were still transported. Many Irish Fenian prisoners continued to be transported to Van Diemen’s land, including Thomas Francis Meagher, leader of the Young Irelanders. Meagher managed to escape and went to the United States in 1852. He was also the Irishman who introduced the Tricolour, and which is now the…

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Old Buildings of Sligo Andersons Brewery

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In 1834, the firm of Davy & Cochran built a brewery on a site at Old Shambles Street now Kempton Promenade off Bridge Street. The business was named Lough Gill brewery and operated until 1842 closing due to bankruptcy. It was then acquired by Charles Anderson. Anderson operated a brewery on Water Lane and transferred his business to the larger site. After Anderson’s death in 1882, the brewery continued to operate for a time.

For a short period, O’Connor, Walsh & Company operated a Sawmills and timber warehouse at the site. By 1889, the buildings were bought by Edward Foley who returned the buildings to brewery use and later mineral drinks production until it closed in 1972. 

In the late 1970’s the Rehabilitation organisation took over the building and used it as a training centre. By 2000, Rehab had moved to new premises and the building was left empty. The…

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Hungry Rock Sligo

Sligo Dark Tales – The perils of travelling alone in the 18th-Century

From the newspaper archives comes the late eighteenth-century story of two young boys herding cattle on Doomore mountain near Coolaney, County Sligo. Booleying farming was an agriculture practice carried out in Ireland. This is where younger members of the farming community usually a teenage girl or boy, would go uphill with cattle to higher pastures to… Continue reading Sligo Dark Tales – The perils of travelling alone in the 18th-Century