Sligo and the Dracula connection

The author Bram Stoker's mother hailed from Sligo. Her name was Charlotte Thornley and she lived with her parents Captain Thomas Thornley, Matilda Blake Thornley along with her two younger brothers Thomas and Richard. Charlotte lived with her family on Correction Street now Old Market Street in the town. It was here where she resided in… Continue reading Sligo and the Dracula connection

Halloween in Sligo in times past

 

 

It wasn’t all fun and games at Halloween in Sligo, you could lose an eye!

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In October 1909, Robert Coulter’s on Thomas Street in Sligo town was the place to shop for all your Halloweve treats, with Nuts, Apples, Grapes, Figs, Bananas and Cakes.

Robert Coulters shop Halloween Sligo Source: Sligo Champion 1909

In 1904 Sligonians could join the Sligo Musical Society and take part in their Samhain musical, described as a romantic Irish Cantata. It was written by Dr. Annie Patterson and won first prize at the Dublin Feis Ceoil in 1902.

Samhain Musical in Sligo 1904 Source: Sligo Champion 1904

Apples for Halloween

At the monthly meeting at the Sligo District Asylum on October 20th 1906, the management committee voted to award Mrs Fox the tender for Halloween apples.

Apples Sligo District Lunatic asylum 20 Oct 1906

Halloween merrymaking leads to assault

Kids today are in danger of losing an eye from fireworks at Halloween but back in 1893, Michael Leonard nearly lost an eye at Halloween for playing an old Irish custom of rapping on doors to warn of Halloween.

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Landed in Van Diemen’s Land

Sligo convict transported to Van Diemen’s Land

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Van Diemen’s Land was set up as a penal colony in 1803 by the British Empire. It is estimated that some 75,000 convicts were shipped there up until 1853 when the mass transportation of people ended. The most common crime that led to transportation was petty theft or larceny. Followed by burglary or housebreaking, highway robbery, stealing clothing, stealing animals, military offences, prostitution and crimes of fraud. Transportation on a large scale ended as the authorities mindful of the rebellion in the American colonies feared a similar uprising could occur on Van Diemen’s Land.

Although mass transportation ended in 1853, political prisoners were still transported. Many Irish Fenian prisoners continued to be transported to Van Diemen’s land, including Thomas Francis Meagher, leader of the Young Irelanders. Meagher managed to escape and went to the United States in 1852. He was also the Irishman who introduced the Tricolour, and which is now the…

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Old Buildings of Sligo Andersons Brewery

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In 1834, the firm of Davy & Cochran built a brewery on a site at Old Shambles Street now Kempton Promenade off Bridge Street. The business was named Lough Gill brewery and operated until 1842 closing due to bankruptcy. It was then acquired by Charles Anderson. Anderson operated a brewery on Water Lane and transferred his business to the larger site. After Anderson’s death in 1882, the brewery continued to operate for a time.

For a short period, O’Connor, Walsh & Company operated a Sawmills and timber warehouse at the site. By 1889, the buildings were bought by Edward Foley who returned the buildings to brewery use and later mineral drinks production until it closed in 1972. 

In the late 1970’s the Rehabilitation organisation took over the building and used it as a training centre. By 2000, Rehab had moved to new premises and the building was left empty. The…

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