Cockran’s Mall Sligo in the 19th Century

Art murals by the talented late Sligo artist Bernard McDonagh on the walls of the back bar in the Embassy/The Belfry on Kennedy Parade, Sligo. McDonagh was influenced by the local history of the street, recreating scenes of Linenhall Street in the late 18 century and early 19th century.     In the late 18th… Continue reading Cockran’s Mall Sligo in the 19th Century

Sligo and the Dracula connection

The author Bram Stoker's mother hailed from Sligo. Her name was Charlotte Thornley and she lived with her parents Captain Thomas Thornley, Matilda Blake Thornley along with her two younger brothers Thomas and Richard. Charlotte lived with her family on Correction Street now Old Market Street in the town. It was here where she resided in… Continue reading Sligo and the Dracula connection

Buildings of Sligo – The Provincial Bank

Sligo’s old buildings – Past and Present

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The Provincial Bank was the first bank opened in Sligo in 1828, originally located across the street near the old bridge on Stephens Street. In 1881, a new Renaissance style building was erected on Stephens Street, designed by the Architect Thomas Manley Deane and built by Joseph Clarence.

The facade is made of Mountcharles sandstone with the side of the building made from Ballisodare limestone. It was built back from the street and originally had ornamental railings. After the bank mergers in the 1970’s, the bank is now operated as Allied Irish Bank (AIB).

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Bank building Sligo 19th century Provincial Bank in Sligo pictured in the 1880’s with ornamental railings

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bsh The building has detailed carvings by DeGroot of Dublin from designs by the architect.

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Sources:

Irish Architectural Archive – < dia.ie >

National Library of Ireland – < nli.ie >

Gallagher, Fiona, The Streets of Sligo – Urban Evolution (Sligo, 2008)

Newspaper Archive – Sligo…

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Cholera Remedy in 1832

In the Summer of 1832, 186 years ago, an outbreak of Cholera was spreading throughout Ireland. Cures and remedy advertisements appeared in newspapers. The text below appeared as an advert for an Apothecary in Sligo. This may have helped some people as dehydration was one of the symptoms. Unfortunately, as many would have taken this… Continue reading Cholera Remedy in 1832

Landed in Van Diemen’s Land

Sligo convict transported to Van Diemen’s Land

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Van Diemen’s Land was set up as a penal colony in 1803 by the British Empire. It is estimated that some 75,000 convicts were shipped there up until 1853 when the mass transportation of people ended. The most common crime that led to transportation was petty theft or larceny. Followed by burglary or housebreaking, highway robbery, stealing clothing, stealing animals, military offences, prostitution and crimes of fraud. Transportation on a large scale ended as the authorities mindful of the rebellion in the American colonies feared a similar uprising could occur on Van Diemen’s Land.

Although mass transportation ended in 1853, political prisoners were still transported. Many Irish Fenian prisoners continued to be transported to Van Diemen’s land, including Thomas Francis Meagher, leader of the Young Irelanders. Meagher managed to escape and went to the United States in 1852. He was also the Irishman who introduced the Tricolour, and which is now the…

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