Cockran’s Mall Sligo in the 19th Century

Art murals by the talented late Sligo artist Bernard McDonagh on the walls of the back bar in the Embassy/The Belfry on Kennedy Parade, Sligo. McDonagh was influenced by the local history of the street, recreating scenes of Linenhall Street in the late 18 century and early 19th century.     In the late 18th… Continue reading Cockran’s Mall Sligo in the 19th Century

Sligo and the Dracula connection

The author Bram Stoker's mother hailed from Sligo. Her name was Charlotte Thornley and she lived with her parents Captain Thomas Thornley, Matilda Blake Thornley along with her two younger brothers Thomas and Richard. Charlotte lived with her family on Correction Street now Old Market Street in the town. It was here where she resided in… Continue reading Sligo and the Dracula connection

Cholera Remedy in 1832

In the Summer of 1832, 186 years ago, an outbreak of Cholera was spreading throughout Ireland. Cures and remedy advertisements appeared in newspapers. The text below appeared as an advert for an Apothecary in Sligo. This may have helped some people as dehydration was one of the symptoms. Unfortunately, as many would have taken this… Continue reading Cholera Remedy in 1832

Old Buildings of Sligo Andersons Brewery

melcoo

In 1834, the firm of Davy & Cochran built a brewery on a site at Old Shambles Street now Kempton Promenade off Bridge Street. The business was named Lough Gill brewery and operated until 1842 closing due to bankruptcy. It was then acquired by Charles Anderson. Anderson operated a brewery on Water Lane and transferred his business to the larger site. After Anderson’s death in 1882, the brewery continued to operate for a time.

For a short period, O’Connor, Walsh & Company operated a Sawmills and timber warehouse at the site. By 1889, the buildings were bought by Edward Foley who returned the buildings to brewery use and later mineral drinks production until it closed in 1972. 

In the late 1970’s the Rehabilitation organisation took over the building and used it as a training centre. By 2000, Rehab had moved to new premises and the building was left empty. The…

View original post 267 more words

Hungry Rock Sligo

Sligo Dark Tales – The perils of travelling alone in the 18th-Century

From the newspaper archives comes the late eighteenth-century story of two young boys herding cattle on Doomore mountain near Coolaney, County Sligo. Booleying farming was an agriculture practice carried out in Ireland. This is where younger members of the farming community usually a teenage girl or boy, would go uphill with cattle to higher pastures to… Continue reading Sligo Dark Tales – The perils of travelling alone in the 18th-Century